Wednesday, April 17, 2024

US imposes fresh sanctions against Iran over its missile, nuclear programs

The United States Treasury Department has introduced a new round of sanctions targeting Iran's ballistic missile and nuclear programs.

The Treasury announced on Wednesday that its Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) targeted three procurement networks based in Iran, Turkey, Oman, and Germany, accusing them of supporting Iran’s ballistic missile, nuclear, and defense programs.

It claimed that these networks had engaged in procuring carbon fiber, epoxy resin, and other material for Iran’s missile program.

These supplies were allegedly used by the Self-Sufficiency Jihad Organization of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps Aerospace Force, the Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics (MODAFL) and other organizations sanctioned by the United States.

“Through complex covert procurement networks, Iran seeks to supply rogue actors around the world with weapons systems that fuel conflict and risk countless civilian lives,” said Brian Nelson, under secretary of the Treasury for terrorism and financial intelligence.

Nelson added the US Treasury will continue to use its tools to disrupt these networks and hold countries assisting in Iran’s drone and missile activities accountable.

Last month, the US Treasury introduced punitive measures targeting Iran’s ballistic missile and drone procurement programs as Washington looked to increase pressure on Tehran for supporting the Axis of Resistance against the Israeli aggression in Gaza.

The Joe Biden administration, which has claimed a diplomatic approach to Iran and efforts to return to the 2015 nuclear program, has not only failed to return to the agreement but has also tightened the sanctions regime against the country.

The United States under former president Donald Trump reinstated crippling sanctions on Iran after unilaterally walking out of the nuclear deal in May 2018, despite Iran’s full compliance with the terms of the JCPOA.

Iran has repeatedly said that its military programs, including its missile industry, are meant for deterrence and defense and not subject to negotiations.

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