World Crafts Council to Globally Register Persian Zilu

The World Crafts Council is considering registering the Iranian-made Zilu, a type of Persian rug, on the list of international handicrafts.

Three experts from the World Crafts Council, an affiliate of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), have arrived in the Iranian city of Meybod to look into the possibility of internationally registering the Zilu woven in Meybod, Yazd province.

“These experts, all of whom are women coming from India, Kuwait and Iran, have visited the Meybod Zilu Weavers’ Company, the Nari-Qaleh Cooperatives, the Shah-Abbasi Complex, and Zilu weaving workshops, the Zilu museum, and an exhibition showcasing photos and documents related to this art and industry,” said Alireza Abolhassani, a deputy governor of Meybod.

“We have made numerous efforts to have the Meybod Zilu registered internationally. This city has great potential and we have revived its potentialities over the past two months and are totally hopeful that we will achieve the desired result,” he said.

The official said a plan is underway to make a 400-square-metre tile with a Zilu design.

Meanwhile, head of the World Craft Council’s Asia Pacific Region (WCC-APR) Ghada Hijjawi-Qaddumi hailed the Zilu industry during the first day of her visit to Meybod.

She said based on the information available and the visit she and other experts made, they found out that Zilu weaving is a popular industry in Meybod, and all family members are somehow involved in it, and that it is one of the main jobs of people in Meybod.

“During the course of these visits, we saw for ourselves all the stages of Zilu weaving and learned that from A to Z of the Zilu weaving process are done inside the town of Meybod, said Hijjawi-Qaddumi.

The WCC assessor said Meybod has the edge in the Zilu industry as authorities in the city are familiar with this art and they themselves are somehow professional Zilu weavers.

She then touched upon the Zilu weaving training centres in the city.

Hijjawi-Qaddumi said the Zilu weaving art in Meybod is noteworthy and it is very great that Zilu weaving is being taught with new methods in the training centres.

She said the fact that women in Meybod are involved in Zilu weaving is a winning ace for the city.

The official underlined it would be important to pay due regard to the Zilu industry and to introduce it to world markets, adding Meybod has secured this accomplishment.

Hijjawi-Qaddumi then talked about the outcome of her assessment of the Meybod Zilu.

“It is still too early to make a decision in that regard, but given the existing evidence and documents as well as the papers received, this industry deserves to be registered globally; however, we should wait for the overall results [of assessments] regarding this issue to be announced,” she noted.

She said after the experts wind up their visits to locations associated with the Zilu weaving art and industry, they will send a report to the World Crafts Council. She said after the report is shared with other members, and they express their full satisfaction, then good news may be announced.

Below you see IRNA’s photos of WCC experts’ visits to Zilu weaving workshops:

   
   

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