Stress, Anxiety, and Your Wellbeing

Stress, Anxiety, and Your Wellbeing

In times of global crisis and uncertainty, we all handle the difficulties in different ways.

We’ve begun to see articles and videos come through of our favourite celebrities and superstars either offering support to their followers or showing a more vulnerable side as they also begin to struggle with the impact of being locked down in their own homes. The effects of this are starting to find a further reach, however, as fears around those fighting on the frontlines start to show.

For the doctors and nurses that are working extra hours and dealing with unimaginable losses, experts fear that they may be at increased risk of PTSD and other such stress induced difficulties – and for those who are at home fearing for their loved ones and fearing for their jobs, the same difficulties are also starting to show through too. Many are starting to report that they’re having extremely vivid dreams as experts attribute stress at home with the ongoing coronavirus situation to be a big part of this – with many turning to alternative methods to help relieve stress and anxiety amidst the time of uncertainty.

Lucid dreaming is a method many have used in the past in an effort to have control over the dreams they have – learning to remember and then remind yourself that you are dreaming are part of the process for this method of self-wellbeing – especially for those that are experiencing more vivid and unpredictable dreams. There are those that turn to top psychics in order to help with this, but it is also a technique that can be learned alone with just a little practice.

Meditation has also been used effectively for many – and it comes in many different forms. There are even apps on your smartphone that can help you to learn different forms of meditation and find one that best suits you, from breathing exercises to methods that utilise sound or visual stimulus to put you in a relaxed frame of mind. As our social media news feeds, our radio and our televisions are surrounded by news with updates on new cases and rising death figures, meditation could be a useful stress relieving tool for you.

Exercise during this time is also extremely important – although not an alternative method to reduce stress and anxiety, it is a proven certainty to help. As you exercise, your body will release endorphins, or chemicals that help you feel good – you may not be able to get to a gym, and may be too nervous to get outside in areas where small groups of people may form, but there are plenty of effective ways to exercise from home.

As we continue to move through the coronavirus epidemic, it is clear that there will still be a long time before we return to normal – and even when the numbers begin to drop and as we return to our daily working routine, stress and anxiety factors around the economy, businesses and those who have lost loved ones will still be present – and it will be more important than ever to look after your wellbeing and to develop methods to handle your stress and anxiety.

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