Tuesday, January 25, 2022

US general says American troops to remain in Iraq

More Articles

Avatar of IFP Media Wire
IFP Media Wire
Reports and views published in the Media Wire section have been retrieved from other news agencies and websites, and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Iran Front Page (IFP) news website. The IFP may change the headlines of the reports in a bid to make them compatible with its own style of covering Iran News, and does not make any changes to the content. The source and URL of all reports and news stories are mentioned at the bottom of each article.
The top US commander for the Middle East said Thursday that the United States will keep the current 2,500 troops in Iraq for the foreseeable future. An Iraqi security official had earlier announced the end of the US-led military presence in Iraq.

he top US commander for the Middle East said Thursday that the United States will keep the current 2,500 troops in Iraq for the foreseeable future. An Iraqi security official had earlier announced the end of the US-led military presence in Iraq.

Gen. Frank McKenzie stated in an interview with The Associated Press at the Pentagon that despite the shift by US forces to a non-combat role in Iraq, they will still provide air support and other military aid for Iraq’s fight against the Islamic State.

Noting that Iranian-backed militias want all Western forces out of Iraq, he noted an ongoing uptick in violence may continue through December.

“They actually want all US forces to leave, and all US forces are not going to leave,” he continued, adding that as a result, “that may provoke a response as we get later into the end of the month.”

The Iraqi government earlier Thursday announced the conclusion of talks on ending the US combat mission against IS. US forces have been largely in an advisory role for some time, so the announced transition changes little. The announcement reflects a July decision by the Joe Biden administration to end the US combat mission in Iraq by Dec. 31.

“We’ve drawn down from bases we didn’t need, we’ve made it harder to get at us. But the Iraqis still want us to be there. They still want the presence, they still want the engagement,” said McKenzie.

“So as long as they want it, and we can mutually agree that’s the case — we’re going to be there,” he added.

He stated he believes Islamic State militants will continue to be a threat in Iraq and that the group will “keep recreating itself, perhaps under a different name.”

The key, he said, will be to ensure that IS is not able to coalesce with other elements around the globe and become increasingly strong and dangerous.

America invaded Iraq in 2003, and at the peak point had more than 170,000 troops battling insurgents in the country and later working to train and advise Iraqi forces. All US forces were withdrawn at the end of 2011, but just three years later, American troops were back to help Iraq beat back the Islamic State group, which had swept across the border from Syria to gain control of a large swath of the country.

The US presence in Iraq has long been a flash point for Tehran, but tensions spiked after a January 2020 US drone strike near the Baghdad airport killed a top Iranian general. In retaliation, Iran launched a barrage of missiles at al-Asad airbase, where US troops were stationed. More than 100 service members suffered traumatic brain injuries in the blasts.

“Iran still pursues a vision of ejecting us,” he said, adding, “And they see the principal battleground for that as being in Iraq. And I believe they are under the view that they can increase friction in Iraq to where we will leave.”

McKenzie, who has headed US Central Command for nearly three years and traveled extensively throughout the region, painted a picture that reflected the recent upheaval in Afghanistan, where US troops departed at the end of August.

On Afghanistan, McKenzie said the al-Qaida extremist group has grown slightly since US forces left and that the ruling Taliban leaders are divided about their 2020 pledge to break ties with the group. He added the departure of the US military and intelligence assets from the country has made it “very hard, not impossible” to ensure that neither al-Qaida nor the Islamic State group’s Afghanistan affiliate can pose a threat to the United States.

McKenzie said that as NATO begins to expand its presence in Iraq as planned, the US will refine its force there. And the total US force presence will depend on future agreements with Iraq’s government.

The US troops in Syria, currently numbering about 900, will continue to advise and assist Syrian rebel forces, McKenzie stated.

He added it’s not clear how much longer that will be necessary but said, “I think we are measurably closer than we were a couple of years ago. I still think we have a ways to go.”

More broadly, McKenzie noted that the US troop presence across the Middle East has significantly dropped since last year, when it peaked amid tensions with Iran, at as much as 80,000.

The US has identified China and Russia as the top national security threats, labeling China as America’s “pacing challenge,” and has looked to focus more effort and assets in the Pacific.

In its recent review of the positioning of US forces around the world, the Pentagon said little about removing or repositioning troops in the Middle East. McKenzie and other top military leaders have long worried that the US military is concentrated in too few locations in the Middle East and must disperse more to increase security.

“We think it is important to work with our partners in the region to present a more complex targeting problem to Iran,” he continued, adding that US will look at other bases and opportunities to move troops around to achieve that goal.

McKenzie stated he is particularly concerned by Iran’s development of ballistic and cruise missiles as well as armed drones.

“And so those things are very concerning to me because they continue to develop them,” he noted, adding, “And they show no signs of abating in their research in this field, and their fielding of new and increasingly lethal and capable weapons.”

Latest article