Friday, April 12, 2024

Russia claims Ukraine suffered 444k losses in manpower since start of war

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu has claimed that Ukraine has lost more than 444,000 soldiers since the beginning of the conflict in 2022.

“As a result of the decisive and active actions of our military personnel, the combat potential of the Ukrainian armed forces is decreasing. On average, since the beginning of the year, the enemy has been losing more than 800 personnel and 120 units of various weapons, including foreign-made, every day,” Shoigu told a meeting with senior military officials on Tuesday.

In total, Ukraine has lost more than 444,000 soldiers since the beginning of the special military operation in 2022, the minister added.

The Russian armed forces have taking control over three settlements in the Donetsk People’s Republic in the past week, namely Pobeda, Lastochkno and Severnoe, Shoigu continued.

“Since the beginning of the year, about 327 square kilometers of the territory of new regions of Russia have been liberated from the Nazis in all directions. Over the past week, the Ukrainian armed forces have been driven out of the settlements of Pobeda, Lastochkino, and Severnoe of the Donetsk People’s Republic.”

The United States is increasing its nuclear capabilities in Europe and adopts promising means of delivering nuclear warheads, Sergei Shoigu said.

“As of today, threats of a radiation, chemical and biological nature are provoked by the actions of Washington, which is increasing its nuclear capabilities on the territory of European countries and is adopting promising means of delivering nuclear charges,” Shoigu added.

Russia’s special military operation shows that the US strategic on deterrence of Russia at the expense of the lives of Ukrainians and military and economic support for Kiev is “pointless”, Shoigu stressed.

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