Iran denounces deadly terror attacks in Indonesian capital

Iran has strongly condemned the recent string of deadly explosions that rocked the Indonesian capital, Jakarta, saying the perpetrators of the “inhumane” act must be brought to justice.

On Thursday, Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Hossein Jaberi Ansari voiced sympathy with the families of the victims as well as the Indonesian government and nation in general, expressing hope that such terror attacks would not hamper Indonesians’ will to promote Islam.

“Such terrorist acts, in a country where restraint and moderation are the defining characteristics of its people and has always been one of the frontrunners in the United Nations peacekeeping missions in the world, once again proved that terrorism and extremism have no boundary,” he said.

The Iranian diplomat further urged a tough response to the perpetrators and supporters of acts of terrorism, highlighting the need for a united and global fight against the ominous phenomenon.

Elsewhere in his remarks, Jaberi Ansari emphasized that the Islamic Republic stands by the Indonesian nation and administration in combating terrorism.

Earlier on Thursday, Jakarta was hit by a series of blasts and a gunfight, centered around Thamrin Street, a major shopping and business district near foreign embassies and the United Nations offices in the megacity.

Jakarta police spokesman Colonel Muhammad Iqbal said seven people, including four attackers were killed in Thursday’s incidents.

The Daesh Takfiri terror group has claimed responsibility for the assaults.

Indonesia’s President Joko Widodo has denounced the attacks and called for calm.

“We condemn these attacks that have disturbed the peace of society and we want to spread this message to the nation and society. I ordered the authorities to catch those responsible for the attacks and even those out there that are involved in this,” he said.

Indonesia has suffered militant attacks in the past and was on high alert over the New Year period after threats from Daesh.